Who We Are

We are men, women, kids, family and friends.

When the founder, Brian, had the idea for this group, he hoped there were others out there like him: People dealing with the life we’ve been dealt by looking PD straight in the eye and saying, “I CAN DO THIS!” The friends met along the way have greatly helped him and others to be confident in facing the struggles of YOPD. The group has surpassed expectations and has created a new family of people that understand, support and care about each other.

Our events are held outside, with occasional indoor activities. Event attendees are expected to respect the wellbeing of our members and be vaccinated for Covid-19 or wear a mask at all times while at an event. There are masks & sanitizer on hand at all events, if needed.

We are a participate-at-your-own-risk, activity-based group. We do our best to give you all the logistical information on each event. It is up to you to decide if you have the physical abilities to safely attend an event. You take full responsibility if you choose to attend an event. We care for your well-being and will support your participation. We are not medical professionals. If you are at an event and find it exceeds your abilities or if you just need a rest period, SPEAK UP. Your safety is a priority.

Member Quotes

“I wanted to share with you how happy I am that I found this group.  Every event has been fun, uplifting and well worth our time.  … It means a lot to know that others are facing the same things we are and to network with PWPs that are having success with certain meds, foods, exercise, etc. I also love being able to ‘just talk’ and learn about everyone’s journey.” – Member Whitney H. 01.2020

“I am so impressed at how SEAYPOD has grown and has consistently offered challenging and healthy outdoor activities for people with young onset Parkinson’s disease. You have organized a stellar program that has offered A-1 movement, exercise and social connection opportunities. “ – Member Emily S. 01.2022

Our Members

Founding Member
Brian Harris

Brian was diagnosed in January 2017, just after turning 48. He works full time and lives in Auburn with his husband, Damion, and dog, Tyson. Brian is an avid hiker and lover of snow fun outings. Brian had the idea for this group to find others that were managing this unexpected part of their lives.

Founding Member
Amy Wilcox

Amy was diagnosed at 48 in July 2017. She works full time as a kindergarten teacher. She lives in Silverdale
with her husband Troy and fur baby Willow. Amy has two grown sons who live in Arizona. She loves to hike, cook,
read, and spend time with her family. SEAYOPD has been key in helping her deal with her diagnosis and
surround herself with positive, like-minded people who are focused on supporting each other and living our lives to
the fullest.

Jeremy & Doreen Likness

Jeremy was diagnosed in February 2020 at the age of 46. Jeremy works full time as a program manager at Microsoft. After his diagnosis, he immediately launched a blog to promote advocacy and raise awareness at https://www.strengthwithparkinsons.com. Jeremy is a member of the leadership team for a disability employee resource group at Microsoft and a board member of the new non-profit Young Onset Parkinson’s Network (YOPN). Jeremy lives in Monroe with his wife, Doreen. He has two grown children and two grandchildren. In his free time, Jeremy loves to hike and pursue his passion of astrophotography.

Charles Burt

Charles Burt was born in Detroit, Michigan and raised in Arlington, Texas. After high school, he joined the Army to serve as an Armor Crewman where he applied the Army Values and technical manuals as tools of self-expression. 
After 20 years of active duty service, Charles retired from the Army and found he had a tough time adjusting to the different culture of civilian life. Seeking a way to connect with other disciplined and dedicated people, he found that many artists share his work ethic and drive to succeed. From this spark of connection Charles began taking art courses at the local community college, and then completed a four-year intensive fine art program at Gage Academy of Art in Seattle. He was once again among disciplined people who were dedicated to their craft, and found a culture where he felt accepted. 
About a year after retiring, Charles developed a tremor in his dominant hand and was later diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, yet he is able to push through the challenges of painting with a tremor and still achieve the hyper realism that gives him a sense of accomplishment in his art. Charles hopes his art and story inspires other veterans to push for their goals outside of the military the same way they did while serving, and shows civilians a different perspective on the military.